Last edited by JoJonos
Friday, July 31, 2020 | History

4 edition of Oil and the Emergence of the Gulf of Guinea found in the catalog.

Oil and the Emergence of the Gulf of Guinea

by Damian Onde Mane

  • 238 Want to read
  • 13 Currently reading

Published by Infinity Pub .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Commerce,
  • Business & Economics,
  • Business/Economics

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL10672216M
    ISBN 10074143816X
    ISBN 109780741438164
    OCLC/WorldCa179792883

    Soares de Oliveira, Oil and Politics in in the Gulf of Guinea, pp. ; Ike Okonta, “Behind the Mask: Explaining the Emergence of MEND in Nigeria's Oil-bearing Niger Delta”, Niger Delta Economies of Violence Working Papers, Working Paper No. 11 (UC Berkeley: Institute Cited by: 6. The Gulf of Guinea is the northeasternmost part of the tropical Atlantic Ocean between Cape Lopez in Gabon, north and west to Cape Palmas in Liberia. The intersection of the Equator and Prime Meridian (zero degrees latitude and longitude) is in the gulf.. Among the many rivers that drain into the Gulf of Guinea are the Niger and the coastline on the gulf includes the Bight of Benin Coordinates: 0°0′N 0°0′E / .

    In recent years, piracy has emerged as a growing problem in the Gulf of Guinea. The gulf has, in the past years, witnessed a sharp rise in pirate attacks. Alarmingly, both the frequency of piracy attacks and the level of physical violence against seafarers have increased in recent years. Piracy in the Gulf of Guinea has become so prevalent that. The Gulf of Guinea, a key oil production hub adjoining no less than eight oil-exporting countries off the western African coast, is now officially the world's deadliest piracy hotspot.

    Abstract. The Gulf of Guinea''s tremendous potential is creating investment opportunities for the region. Some of its resources, such as oil, minerals, and forests, continue to attract significant investments whereas others, like natural gas, could be exploited to their full Author: Damian Ondo Mañe. Cameroon and Nigeria export the most pangolin scales from the Gulf of Guinea to Asia. • The largest number of domestic seizures are in Cameroon. • Arboreal pangolins at the Malabo market used to be sourced from Bioko Island, but are now sourced from the mainland. • Giant pangolins have been shipped to Bioko Island for sale since Cited by: 8.


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Oil and the Emergence of the Gulf of Guinea by Damian Onde Mane Download PDF EPUB FB2

Oil and the Emergence of the Gulf of Guinea: Prospects and Challenges from Oil and Other Natural Resources Paperback – Octo by Damian Onde Mane (Author) See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Paperback, Octo Author: Damian Onde Mane. For a book that covers a broad range of diverse issues, Oil and the Emergence of the Gulf of Guinea is a surprisingly readable volume.

For those just delving into the topic, Damian Ondo Mañe provides examples and breakdowns of some of the more complex subjects, yet there are enough solid data and thorough research to satisfy more seasoned economists. The answer is the Gulf's large petroleum reserves, which allow the elites of Angola, Equatorial Guinea, and Nigeria to reap the benefits of international investment and expertise regardless of Cited by:   Focusing on local content in the oil and oil service sectors and the changing accumulation strategies of the domestic elite, this book questions what kinds of development are possible through natural resource extraction and argues that a new form of developmental state—the ‘petro-developmental state’—may now Oil and the Emergence of the Gulf of Guinea book emerging in the Gulf of Guinea, allowing states to capitalise on a.

Downloadable. The Gulf of Guinea's tremendous potential is creating investment opportunities for the region. Some of its resources, such as oil, minerals, and forests, continue to attract significant investments whereas others, like natural gas, could be exploited to their full potential if necessary investments were undertaken.

Nevertheless, the Gulf of Guinea has to cope with numerous. Ricardo Soares de Oliveira is Associate Professor in Comparative Politics, University of Oxford, fellow of St Peter's College, Oxford, and fellow of the Global Public Policy Institute, Berlin.

He is the author of Oil and Politics in the Gulf of Guinea and co-editor of China Returns to Africa, both of which are published by Hurst. as diamond and gold. Countries from the Gulf of Guinea, including Nigeria, Angola, Equatorial Guinea, Cameroon, Republic of Congo, Gabon, and Chad are oil producers and are expected to become major suppliers of energy.

São Tomé and Príncipe will soon join this group of countries. Emergence of the Gulf of Guinea in the Global Economy; Prospects and Challenges.

Damian Ondo Mañe. No 05/, IMF Working Papers from International Monetary Fund. Abstract: The Gulf of Guinea's tremendous potential is creating investment opportunities for the region.

Some of its resources, such as oil, minerals, and forests, continue to attract significant investments whereas others, like Cited by:   The Gulf of Guinea's tremendous potential is creating investment opportunities for the region. Some of its resources, such as oil, minerals, and forests, continue to attract significant investments whereas others, like natural gas, could be exploited to their full potential if necessary investments were undertaken.

Nevertheless, the Gulf of Guinea has to cope with numerous Cited by:   This article explores the full ramifications of the evolving strategic environment in the Gulf of Guinea. It argues that the ‘new scramble’ or ‘oil rush’ in the region since its emergence as a critical energy repository and a strategic supplier to the global oil markets has elicited multiple lines of interest represented by both state and non-state by: 6.

Furthermore, the book’s approach is unabashedly academic and would be most useful to those in academia. The Petro Developmental State in Africa: Making Oil Work in Angola, Nigeria and the Gulf of Guinea.

Jesse Salah Ovadia. Hurst Publishers. Ed Reed is the editor of NewsBase’s Africa oil and gas-focused report, AfrOil. Follow him on. Gabon’s oil industry started gaining attention in when several oil deposits were discovered in neighbouring regions of Libreville.

In addition to the oil industry, Gabon’s location overlooking the Gulf of Guinea and the Atlantic Ocean has led to the emergence of another important economic sector. Abstract. The Gulf of Guinea's tremendous potential is creating investment opportunities for the region.

Some of its resources, such as oil, minerals, and forests, continue to attract significant investments whereas others, like natural gas, could be exploited to their full potential if necessary investments were by: Get this from a library.

Emergence of the Gulf of Guinea in the global economy: prospects and challenges. [Damian Ondo Mañe; International Monetary Fund. Office of the Executive Director, Africa,] -- The Gulf of Guinea's tremendous potential is creating investment opportunities for the region.

Some of its resources, such as oil, minerals, and forests, continue to attract significant. (). The petro-developmental state in Africa: Making oil work in Angola, Nigeria and the Gulf of Guinea.

South African Journal of International Affairs: Vol. 23, No. 4, pp. Author: Sylvia Croese. It may well be that the attention paid to the fate of the Gulf of Guinea nations is ephemeral, and that ‘[o]ne day – when oil is exhausted or is no longer craved – the Gulf of Guinea's relevance to the outside world will again decrease, and it may find itself hurled once more back into the tenuously connected “Afrique inutile”’.

38 Cited by: The Gulf of Guinea’s tremendous potential is creating investment opportunities for the region. Some of its resources, such as oil, minerals, and forests, continue to attract significant investments whereas others, like natural gas, could be exploited to their full potential if necessary investments were.

In a working paper entitled "Emergence of the Gulf of Guinea in the Global Economy: Prospects and Challenges" issued in Decemberthe IMF official clearly states that the tremendous. The petro-developmental state in Africa: making oil work in Angola, Nigeria and the Gulf of Guinea.

[Jesse Salah Ovadia] -- Focusing on local content in the oil and oil service sectors and the changing accumulation strategies of the domestic elite, this book questions what kinds of development are possible through natural. The strategic importance of West Africa’s Gulf of Guinea – the stretch of coastline spanning from Gabon to Liberia that includes 15 states which have huge economic importance to the United States and the West – is hard to overstate.

For one, the U.S. is expected to import a quarter of its oil from the Gulf of Guinea nations by. Environmental pollution in the Gulf of Guinea (GOG) coastal zone has caused eutrophication and oxygen depletion in the lagoon systems, particularly around the urban centres, resulting in decreased.Piracy attacks in the Gulf of Guinea have taken a worrying trend.

Unlike the Somali pirates, the pirates in the Gulf of Guinea target the cargoes, especially the oil laden tankers for their : Raymond Gilpin.The eight oil states in West Africa around the Gulf of Guinea together produce some five million barrels of oil a day and may hold as much as a tenth of the world's oil reserves.

Soares de Oliveira has written an important study of the impact of oil on the region's politics.